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Kayaking Adventures
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dspid2404



Joined: 01 Jun 2009
Posts: 290
Location: Virginia, U.S.A.

PostPosted: Tue Oct 11, 2011 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice photo. Its definitely one worth keeping.
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 6:22 am    Post subject: Submarine sighting Reply with quote

Submarine Sighting

Went for a recce trip to find new fishing spots,
but spotted this cruising submarine instead.
A rare sighting indeed!



Last edited by Alex on Tue Oct 18, 2011 2:30 am; edited 1 time in total
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sonar



Joined: 28 May 2011
Posts: 174
Location: Northeast. U.K

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great picture.
Here is another rare photo of what seems to be a new type sub...

coming up or going down Come to think of it it's still going down..


Click on the photo for a bigger picture..




Sorry it was my mates very first water skiing lesson

AND THE LAST LESSON.. Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Circle of life

Spotted this overhead while kayaking
A halo around the sun

Everything in our universe revolves around the sun
The centre source of enegy

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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Wed Oct 19, 2011 7:52 am    Post subject: Blessed Birthday Reply with quote

My Blessed Birthday

Caught a little birthday present today
Spotted Snapper




Bonus catch in the rain (Showers of blessing)
Spanish Mackerel

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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Sat Oct 22, 2011 8:17 pm    Post subject: Southern adventure Reply with quote

Southern Adventure

It was a glorious morning to set out for an adventurous outing around the Southern Islands. I was all set by 7am and headed out joyously.


After heading to the nearest floating beacon to jig for live bait,
I headed to the east side of this island named Tekukor.
It is a good fishing ground for Groupers 
but also famous for snagging anchors.
While crossing the channel to reach this island,
I noticed that the current was must stronger than I had expected.
White caps were forming on top of each coming wave.
I proceeded to head to the southern tip of the island
and conditions there were equally treacherous.
Realizing that the current was flowing in an inverted-Y manner,
I decided to anchor at the middle of the island,
about 50metres from the beach.


Everything was going according to plan so far and I started to fish.
The current seemed too strong for my liking.
I had to use double sinkers and they were still drifting on the sea bed.
I did manage to catch and release some Hinds.

After awhile, I decided to change spot, and to my horrors the anchor was snagged!
I tried numerous time to paddle against the current to pull the anchor from the opposite direction,
but each time the anchor line would slack and I would quickly drift to where I started from.
After some thought, I came up with 3 options:

Option 1

Hook the anchor line to my ice box,
wait for the tide to change directions,
(that would take another 3 hours or so)
return and pull it from the other direction, it worked 2 years ago, elsewhere.

Option 2

Cut the anchor line,
lose my beloved anchor,
fish for rest of the day without anchor.
(it was barely 8.30am at that moment!)

Option 3

Continue to fish, since there were fishes biting,
and as the kayak was not drifting toward whirlpools about 100metres away,
wait for passing boats and signal for help with my paddle and whistle.

It appeared that option 3 was the wisest choice.
While waiting for a rescue vessel, I could see from a distance,
that even 150-seater ferries heading for Batam, Indonesia,
had to tact to shallow waters as they pass the channel.
Another amazing occurrence was that 3 coast guard patrol boats
had sped pass without noticing my waving paddle nor hearing my whistle.
It was after an hour or so that a little 6-seater fishing boat (without an enclosed cabin) that responded to my SOS. The fishermen were very kind and knew exactly what to do once I told them what had happened. I had rigged my anchor, so all they did was to power against the current with their boat motor and off came the cable tie, releasing the anchor.
After that, I was glad to recover my THRICE-lost-but-am-found-again anchor.


Then I headed back to calm waters and did some coastal kayaking,
not in a hurry to get into any snaggy episode again.
Surveyed these sea view bungalows which cost, at this present moment, at least US$4 000 000 each! And the cost is still rising.


After that I met a pair of leisure paddlers having their morning workout.



Then I saw more paddlers, 2-seaters, 5-seaters and 7-seaters.
These guys and gals seem to be training for some sort of competition.
And are headed to the place where I just came from, good luck to them!


East (Chinese ship) meets west (Sailboat), literally.
(Your left in this photo is east)


Found a nice spot and continued fishing.
No big fish today, all juveniles including Yellowtail Fursilier, Leather Jackets, Whiptails (heaps of them) and more Hinds
I was too busy catching and releasing them, only took picture of the last Hind.


In the midst of eating my lunch, I spotted a familiar boat of a brother-in-Christ.


Its name is KAIROS, which means "opportune time" in Greek.
A quick phone call to him from my kayak confirmed that it was indeed his captain ferrying his guests to a charity event where he awaits.


The AE10.5 is light weight and can be easily lifted up rock embankments all by myself.
So I chose a spot just 2mins walk from the nearest beach train station that can take me home 30 mins away.


Finally, an air-conditioning journey!
Love the AE10.5 for its light weight and portability.


Writing about this a day later brings back good memories,
battling the natural elements makes me feel alive,
looking forward to my next southern adventure in search of pelagics,
benthos and benthopelagics.
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:45 pm    Post subject: Passing shower Reply with quote

Passing Shower

Spotted this while at a resort in a neighbouring country.
A passing shower.
The denser the clouds the darker the color.
The rain was heading from right to left in the photo.

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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 3:21 am    Post subject: Rigging an anchor Reply with quote

Rigging an anchor

Was snagged recently and had trouble retrieving my anchor.

Here is a photo of a rigged anchor.
A yank of the anchor rope would break the black cable tie, releasing the stuck anchor.


However if you only have thick cable ties,
you may need to nip the tie at its neck to reduce the thickness.
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:38 am    Post subject: North-eastern adventure Reply with quote

North-eastern adventure

Launched from a newly upgraded Punggol jetty at the north-eastern part of Singapore.


First stop, the Outward Bound School, located on an offshore island a few kilometres from the mainland.
The "pirate ship" is actually a combination of rope obstacles where participants have to overcome their fear of heights and put their ability to balance to the test.
At the coastline, participants prepare to launch for sea expeditions.


Next, was to catch baitfishes near a floating beacon for fishing later.


While fishing, I witnessed this awesome sunset along the coast of a place named Pasir Ris which means white sands in the Malay language.

Click on the link below to watch a 90-second video:
http://s1139.photobucket.com/albums/n555/lewchinw/?action=view&current=P99SunsetVideo.mp4

Before returning back to the mainland, I had to locate an entrance/exit from a stream of floating blue drums which prevents speed boats from making quick drop offs of unwanted visitors unto our shores.
The local police coast guards are always nearby to keep a close watch.
Coincidentally, I discovered, with my fish finder, that the area within these barriers consist of a few "honey pots" for fishing.
Also, it is a very good place for kids who wish to practice paddling.


The night was brightly lit with a full moon and what I believe is the star Orion.


The next day, I headed out again, this time to my snapper spot.
My first time heading out on back-to-back days.
Singapore is a tropical country and
one could experience a bright sunny day then
the next day, heavy rain and showers.
That, is exactly what I happened to me.
The only thing rewarding about my second day was this Red snapper.

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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2011 3:17 am    Post subject: Recce trip for island launch/landing spots Reply with quote

Recce trip for island launching and landing spots

Went for a recce trip to find new launching spots
as well as landing spots on this island called Ubin,
situated on the North-eastern coast of Singapore.
I am planning to someday, kayak to Ubin,
land on the western coast,
cycle across the island on my foldable bike
and launch from the eastern coast of Ubin
and kayak back to mainland Singapore and land at Changi point.
Perhaps I would also kayak-fish along the way on this kayak-cycle-kayak expedition.
Here's a map of the island.
(Pulau means island and Ubin means tile in the Malay language)


Ubin is surrounded mostly by a mangrove coastline and may not be easy to land on or launch from.



The island has its wildlife worth cycling around for.
Spotted this Oriental tree snake

Please click the link below for a 23-second video:
http://s1139.photobucket.com/albums/n555/lewchinw/?action=view&current=U99GreenSnake.mp4

Removed it from the tree for a closer look,
in the process saving the life of the tree lizard.


Also spotted this wild boar on its evening stroll.


Besides fauna, the island is also a treasure for rare flora.
Like these Pigeon Orchids.


Went up the Jejawi towel for an aerial view.
You can see a potential launch spot from the jetty on the right bottom corner.


A kayaker was spotted as we were walking around Chek Jawa wetlands.



After convincing ourselves that the kayak-cycle-kayak expedition will be an adventure of a life time, it was time to head back to the mainland by boat.
You can see the mainland and our navy battleship patroling the coast.


During the boat ride, we passed this landing spot at Changi point.



I hope to accomplish this dream expedition by 2011.
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 3:32 am    Post subject: Fish and salad Reply with quote

A safe way to photograph a fish armed with 3-stings.
Away from the kayak, away from potential excruciating stings.




My wife's cooking has changed my perception of such a fish.
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JimD



Joined: 22 Oct 2010
Posts: 65
Location: UK

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 6:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting idea, the kayak/bike/kayak ride. Will you be transporting the bike on the kayak, or collecting it at the landing place?

What sort of fish was the stinging one? At a guess it's spines on the dorsal and pectoral fins that are dangerous? They look a bit thicker than needed for swimming..
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Sun Nov 13, 2011 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

JimD wrote:
Interesting idea, the kayak/bike/kayak ride. Will you be transporting the bike on the kayak, or collecting it at the landing place?


I was thinking, at sea, the kayak will give the foldable bike a ride,

and on land the bike will give the inflatable kayak a ride.
I'll be the navigator on both fronts.
One way trip, not turning back. Wink

JimD wrote:
What sort of fish was the stinging one? At a guess it's spines on the dorsal and pectoral fins that are dangerous? They look a bit thicker than needed for swimming..


You are right all dorsal and pectoral fins are venomous.
It is an Arius venosus Valenciennes belonging to the family of Ariidae.
Also known simply as the Yellow sea catfish.

When my wife presented it as a dish at dinner,
it was barely recognizable. Surprised
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2011 9:25 pm    Post subject: Channel crossing with a bike Reply with quote

Channel crossing with a bike

My kayak swopped places with my foldable bike for this outing.
Usually my kayak would have been on the trolley and fishing gear in the daffel bag,
but this time round I had loaded a paddle board in it.


I had picked a relatively light weight and compact bike but also equipped with mountain climbing gears.
My first attempt at becoming amphibious with a bike and paddle board. 
Hope to do so with my kayak in my future attempts, 
once my bike trailer for kayak has been completed.


Upon reaching the Labrador Park train station about 2 kilometres from the launching spot,
I assembled my bike for a short pedal there.


On my way to the launch spot,
I had confirmed to myself that cycling with a paddle board 
and fishing gear would not be a difficult nor tiring task.
This paves the way for future amphibious fishing expeditions,
especially for those spots only accessible by dirt track bikes.


Next challenge was launching from an algae filled 
and very slippery ramp with tiny but sharp barnacles.
As I was still nursing an ankle injury, it took me quite a few minutes,
before I could figure out an 100% sure way to launch without slipping.
It was through the middle of the ramp 
where all the concrete grooves met at the main spine, 
like those we see on a plant leaf.
Along this main spine, there is relatively more friction and less algae.
All fellow kayak anglers who wish to fish here may try this path,
I had moved up and down along it quite a few times to fasten my bike and gear.


After everything was set up, I was ready to launch,
but suddenly the was a cracking sound of thunder.
I looked up and saw this.
Could I have come all the way to the edge of the water and have to turn back?


Went to check the nearest location map to see what are the safe possibilities if it rains.
The route I decided then to take was along the embankment,
head west till I reach a long jetty (in gray), beach up and call it the day.
Should be able to complete within half an hour, or so I thought.
I started near the star marked by a red text box on the map.


So, into the water I went, before embarking on my planned route,
I headed to these three floating buoys for a balance trial.
If I capsize, at least it would be quite a short swim back to shore with my board and bike (12.8kg).


Although the paddle board has a lower centre of gravity (CG) than my AE kayak,
the bike has somewhat raised the CG and moved it towards the rear.
Instead having a tube of air to support my floatation as in my kayak,
I now only have air below me to keep me afloat.
Overall balancing was definitely not as easy as for a kayak.
After going around the buoys and rocking around to convince myself that it was safe to proceed further,
I went on the route as planned.
There was a rock outcrop that stood in waters just outside Labrador's shore.
These waters now house Keppel harbor, Singapore's main harbor for more almost 200 years.
This is a replica of the rock outcrop which sailors in the past used as a navigational guide into the western entrance of Keppel harbor.
The name giving to this monument is the Dragon's teeth gate.


Next, I checked out the nearest floating beacon.
I had deliberately left my fishing gear at home so that I can stay focus on the amphibious training.
Well, getting baitfish from this beacon should not be too much trouble at all.
Getting there was not easy though, by now I had established that there was a head wind and I was heading against current.


The jetty didn't look too far away.
The clouds could't hold anymore, it began to rain.
Oh nevermind, it told myself, on a paddle board, 
I am more than half wet anyway.


Finally, the landing spot, that was not too difficult, so I thought.
As I beached, from afar I noticed that the gates were not open.
I went for a closer, my horrors were confirmed,
the gates were chained and locked!
I should have checked the park website before I left.
Checking it now, it says "for public safety we have closed the jetty and rocky shores". 
What an irony for me, it would be safer for me if they have kept it opened.
Then again, I don't think anyone else takes this "path less travel".


Miraculously, the rain stopped!
At the moment, heading to the nearby Sentosa island seemed more appealing than heading back to the slippery ramp.


Heading back was easy, I am now assisted by a tail wind and the current flow.
Sentosa island is on the left and to the right is the open sea leading to Indonesia.


The next challenge would be to cross a very busy channel filled with large ferries and cruise ships.
While waiting for the opportune time, I paused to admire the architecture of these buildings named The Sails.


Off I went, pretending that I am Uzain Bolt, regulating my paddle strokes,
maintaining speed as well as balance.
Ferries like the one you see below were zooming pass during evening rush hour.
I had crossed the Keppel channel.  Smile


Arriving on the opposite bank was joyful.
The most difficult part of my trial was accomplished.
This meant my amphibious training was a successful one and
I could move on to training with a more stable but heavier AE10.5 kayak next.


Fort Siloso is a relic from World War II.
Our colonial rulers had thought that the Japanese would attack Singapore from the south 
but as it turned out, this fort was never used to defend Singapore 
because the Japanese attacked and conquered Singapore from the north.


I had planned to paddle all the way to Tanjong beach,
but with more rain clouds approaching,
and night fall beckoning,
I decided that it would be wise to land on this small stretch of beach 
and make my way up the rocks.


As I beached, I was thinking to myself that this would be a good place to launch in the future for a grouper hunt.


I had used a woozie mat so that the sharp edges of the bike would not puncture my paddle board.
I had also used two 6-feet bungee cords to tie the bike to my paddle board,
I find them very dependable as their elasticity causes them to self tighten along the rocky or rather wavy journey.  Smile
With plans to train with a kayak next,
I took one last good look at this rare set up.


Pedal imprint on the woozie mat.


Did not expect to see any wildlife today,
but as I packed, this peacock came to say hello.


And it led me to his 4 wives (can you spot the 4 peahens?).   Smile


The place I landed was actually the backyard of a holiday resort.


The Rasa Sentosa Resort, with an awesome sea view.


I had packed simply yet effectively for this trip,
all basic equipment to succeed were available.
However, I had forgotten to check the air pressure of my bike tyres.
I had been cycling on almost flat tyres since the beginning of the trip.
Made it to the nearest bike rental shop and happily found the air compressor.


I like the slogon of the bike shop.
Go green, cycle and explore.


With my bike tyres at maximum pressure,
getting around was literally a breeze, as if I could fly.   Smile


The newly opened indoor Sky Diving facility, iFly.
It is a place where a gigantic fan blows at you and suspends you in the air,
defying gravity.


Sentosa beach station, where I packed my bike.


Sentosa Express at VivoCity, where I returned to mainland Singapore.


A "bike-yak-athon" in the making.   Smile
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Alex



Joined: 21 Oct 2009
Posts: 207
Location: Singapore, South East Asia

PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2012 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loading the AE Expedition for a father-and-son-expedition












Last edited by Alex on Mon May 28, 2012 11:49 pm; edited 2 times in total
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