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Regulations for paddling at sea

Posted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 2:53 am
by Gaelounet
An Advanced Frame Convertible owner told me that this kayak has been certified by the US Coast Guard to be allowed to be paddled up to 3 miles from the shore. I looked up the AE website and could not find any confirmation of this certification. Has such certification actually been awarded to the AE Advanced Frame kayaks ?
I've been paddling in some places in the US and Canada some years ago, and I remember that regulations relative to sea kayaking were specific to the area or the state. Maybe it's changed ?

Posted: Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:12 am
by JCOOLEY
The Coast Guard inspects our kayaks every year. As far as what they require, they only require that the kayak has a Hull ID# and a Capacity label, which they do. I checked out their wesite and there isn't anything stating how far off the coast you can paddle. This goes for all kayaks, whether inflatable or a hard shell. I shot them email to double check on the distance and will let you know if I hear anything back. Canada may be different so you may want to check with Canada's requlations. It can vary from country to country.

Jeremy
8)

Canada's regulations

Posted: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:03 am
by PJohanson
Canada's laws for marine safety on salt water for small boats including kayaks are pretty basic.
You must have a PFD, a 50-foot floating rope, a bailer or water pump, a waterproof flashlight and a noisemaker.
There's a kit sold by Scotty for $20 which makes you legal -- it is a plastic bailer with screw-on watertight lid (has a loop so you can fasten it to your kayak with a cord or carabiner) with 50 feet of poly rope coiled inside, a small waterproof flashlight and a whistle.
I'd recommend clipping another whistle to the shoulder of your PFD, and get a small air horn if you really want an effective noisemaker.
As for a waterproof light, if you don't want to spend some $30-40 for a deck light, I've already mentioned on the forum somewhere the Filzer i-mouse blinking light. I keep one on the shoulder strap of my PFD.

Posted: Sat Jun 21, 2008 8:35 am
by Reddog1
Where would I find the "kit sold by Scotty for $20 which makes you legal -- it is a plastic bailer with screw-on watertight lid (has a loop so you can fasten it to your kayak with a cord or carabiner) with 50 feet of poly rope coiled inside, a small waterproof flashlight and a w***histle."?

Do you know where I could purchase the Filzer i-mouse blinking light?


Wayne

Posted: Sat Jun 21, 2008 10:26 pm
by PJohanson
The Scotty kit is sold at Canadian Tire stores, and other stores that sell boating equipment. Check www.scottypaddlesports.com and see if that helps you find a local vendor.
The Filzer mouse used to be sold through Mountain Equipment Co-op www.mec.ca and may still be. I had an order of ten delivered for me to pick up at the store in my city. Also, check www.filzer.com for a local vendor.
People at your local paddle club or store will have good advice about products that are locally available, meet requirements and work well.

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 6:14 am
by sedimentary
I was under the impression that a blinking light was a signaling device which is attached to your PFD and activated for people fallen overboard?? The USCG would probably be bent at following recreational kayakers beacons thinking it is distress!!! :oops:

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 7:41 am
by Reddog1
Thanks for the links.


Wayne

Posted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 9:18 pm
by PJohanson
Sedimentary wrote:
I was under the impression that a blinking light was a signaling device which is attached to your PFD and activated for people fallen overboard?? The USCG would probably be bent at following recreational kayakers beacons thinking it is distress!!!

Nah, don't be embarrassed. The blinking light is just supposed to say "I'm here!" not be a distress signal. Kayaks are pretty much invisible, both visually and on radar. Some paddlers have deck lights on a 3 foot high post. One guy I read about ties an aluminum-covered wine bag to a fishing rod so he can elevate it above his deck as a radar reflector.

As for distress signals, repeated blasts from an air horn might get you some attention. Flares are a good distress signal too. Waving your paddle vertically may catch someone's eye (remember, kayaks are pretty much invisible down at the waterline).

There are deck lights from Seattle Sports (google 'em) which you can put on a kayak deck or a post on the deck. These are good for evening or night outings.