Your AE Repair Kit vs. Tear-Aid

Questions, suggestions, answers, products etc. about repairing, cleaning and maintaining your kayak.

Moderators: JCOOLEY, rsimpson

Post Reply
lee johnson
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:51 pm
Location: vancouver canada

Your AE Repair Kit vs. Tear-Aid

Post by lee johnson » Tue Nov 03, 2009 7:11 am

This is a comment on the advantages and limitations of Tear-Aid in comparison to a "proper" repair with the repair kit that comes with your kayak. Thanks, in all likelihood, to a small sharp rock in my West Marine Skedaddle - the model with only side sleeves and thus exposed chambers in the bow and stern - the seam along the edge of the outside stern chamber was punctured. I put a generous Tear-Aid patch over it and went out on the water for a couple of hours - with no problems. The next day, though, the small hole under the Tear-Aid had split into a line over 1" long and exceeded one side of the Tear-Aid patch. What had happened is that the Tear-Aid patch stretched, thus allowing the puncture to stretch underneath it and develop into a bigger problem. The moral of the story? - Tear-Aid works great as a temporary emergency "fix" but needs fixing, in turn, with the permanent repair made possible by the AE repair kit that comes with your kayak: that kit has patches for inflation chambers, hull, decking, and coamings + the appropriate glue - but takes at least 12 hours for drying and setting, whereas Tear-Aid (Type A, especially) is good to go within a few minutes. Tear-Aid works great on materials that do not stretch, but, because it stretches on inflation chambers, it will not hold things together on that kind of moving surface. In that case, the AE repair kit is the way to go - but requires the patience of letting the patch set properly. To make assurance doubly sure (as a guy named Shakespeare once said), I put McNett's Aquaseal over the AE patch - to hold down edges for good. Aquaseal also requires 12 hours to dry properly.
Of course, the upgraded Lagoon now has fully covered inflation chambers, just like the Advanced Frame line; and so what is said here about the exposed design of an older WM Skedaddle is probably no longer an issue - the new designs are abrasion-proof, by comparison. The point here is simply to note that Tear-Aid is a terrific emergency tactic - but that the AE repair kit is the long-term strategy for making a lasting repair.

lee johnson
Posts: 104
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 2:51 pm
Location: vancouver canada

Post by lee johnson » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:33 am

One additional point: Tear-Aid comes in Type A and Type B - the latter working better for vinyl because it resists softening and turning "gummy" in sunlight - and is probably the one most of us would be tempted use on our IKs. Type A takes almost no time to set, though - has 90% adhesion upon application and 100% within one hour. Thus, this is the one to use for a quick and convenient repair until a "proper" repair can be done at leisure. Type B has a 50% adhesion upon application and requires 24 hours before reaching 100%. Type B, taking a much longer time than Type A to reach its full usefulness, would still, in my opinion, result in a less secure patch than the stronger, thicker materials in your AE repair kit. So, when making a permanent repair (one that takes from 12 to 24 hours for "curing" - 12 for the AE repair kit and up to 24 hours for the Type B Tear-Aid), I still think the best thing to do is to go with the AE repair kit and its selection of patches that exactly suit the kind of repair required. And, if you are particularly fussy and want your repair to result in making that part of your kayak perhaps even stronger than it was originally, I strongly recommend putting McNett's Aquaseal over the patch and its edges. From personal experience, I can attest to Aquaseal's ability to stick to my hair and skin with great adhesion - better than any other product I have ever tried to get off my person! It also works wonders on my kayaks.

seraulu1
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2010 1:47 am

''Newbie''

Post by seraulu1 » Thu Apr 01, 2010 3:23 am

Hi all,


Thanks for the suggestion that's very kind and helpful thanks for that and by the way i am newbie to these forum i apologize if i have no comment/suggestion for now maybe in my next visit,and i apologize for my bad English too hope you understand it!!!!!and by the way thanks again!how to hypnotize someone

philipandrews1
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:40 pm
Location: Australia

Post by philipandrews1 » Fri Apr 02, 2010 5:44 pm

Hey Lee

Thanks for such a comprehensive post here!! I use Tear A type B vinyl and it works well.

Also thanks for the cool tip of using McNett's Aquaseal, nice idea

Thanks

User avatar
PJohanson
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:48 pm
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada

Post by PJohanson » Fri Apr 02, 2010 11:37 pm

Lee makes a great point! The AE repair kit really is the best for a proper, lasting repair.
One of my paddle friends carries a half-roll of duct tape in her dunk bag (along with granola bars, firestarters & spare clothes) for emergency temporary repairs to any of our kayaks, hardshell or inflatable. I tried telling her that it would be miserable work getting the tape glue off my AE kayak's inflation chamber, but she figures that once the emergency is over and everyone's home safe she wouldn't mind if I had to sit on my porch and pick at the glue.

yvd1
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2018 6:36 am

Post by yvd1 » Thu Aug 02, 2018 3:15 pm

Reply from Lee was very informative to me ( a newbie to AE who tries to absorb all good info in the forums). AE repair kit is recommended everywhere as a best long term repair. Which makes sense as it comes from the manufacturer.

I need to decide what to carry in AE 1009 kayak for emergency repair in a remote area to get home (i.e. just to buy some time until I can properly repair at home with AE kit).

Can someone please clarify:

For a temporary and quick repair, is Tear-Aid Type A a best option? Can Tear-Aid Type A be used on PVC ( i.e. tubes, hull, etc.)? Based on its description, Type A seems recommended for fabric.

User avatar
PJohanson
Posts: 672
Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:48 pm
Location: Vancouver Island, Canada

Post by PJohanson » Thu Aug 02, 2018 10:10 pm

Lee's comment above is pretty clear.
For emergency repairs, if you can wait 12 hours while the AE repair kit cures, do that.
If you absolutely must slap on a quick repair and get out of a place right away, use Tear Aid Type A but expect that it will be only reasonably good and only for that day. Be careful not to over-inflate, especially in hot sunshine. Do a proper repair before going on the water again.

JCOOLEY
Site Admin
Posts: 977
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 2:46 pm
Location: Benicia, CA

Post by JCOOLEY » Mon Aug 06, 2018 8:11 am

Tear Aid Type B is what works best with the PVC as well as the polyester for temporary fixes.

yvd1
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2018 6:36 am

Post by yvd1 » Mon Aug 06, 2018 6:28 pm

JCOOLEY,

My understanding is that with Type B , I have to wait 24 hrs before I can use the repaired tube.

I am not asking for a repair that lasts. For that I will use AE repair kit when I get home.

Can you please read my question again. I am asking for quickest way to make a repair in a field that would allow me to get home.

It sounds from Lee posting that Type A would be more suited for this even on vinyl.

JCOOLEY
Site Admin
Posts: 977
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 2:46 pm
Location: Benicia, CA

Post by JCOOLEY » Tue Aug 07, 2018 7:57 am

Type B adheres 50% immediately and continues to adhere over 24 hrs.
It is specifically meant for the materials that our kayaks are made out of.

Type A is not meant for the materials our kayaks are made of and will not stick as well.

We have tested these and would not recommend them if we knew they didn't work they way they are supposed to.

Post Reply