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inflation

Posted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 4:54 pm
by bettyv
tips please for quickly releasing depressed spring after inflating, in order not to lose air and have to repump. I try wetting my finger to increase grip, but that trick does not always work. thanks...

Posted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 8:40 am
by JCOOLEY
The way the spring valve works is you want it to be closed when inflating. If it is open, then it is in the deflate position. When it is closed, the air from the pump will force the valve open and then the spring loaded plunger will automatically close as soon as air is no longer being pumped into the valve. If when inflating, air continues to come out of the valve after removing the pump, then it is still in the deflate position. Push in and turn a quarter turn until it "pops up". This should be the closed "inflate" position.

Jeremy
8)

Posted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 8:49 am
by bettyv
Thanks Jeremy....the problem is the spring does not pop back up thus I have to try manually and that's when I lose air. I'm using the hand pump with gauge which was sold accompanying the product. What am I missing here in the process? Thanks....

Posted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 9:11 am
by JCOOLEY
If the spring isn't popping back up, that means that you already have it locked into the delfate position. Because you have the pump with the gauge, the only way to get an accurate reading is to have the valve locked in the deflate position. The gauge works on pressure pushing back into to give a reading. If the valve is closed, or in the inflate position, then once it closes after the air has stopped flowing, there won't be air coming back out to give the gauge a reading.
The best thing that you can do is leave it as it is in the open or deflate position so that you can get an accurate reading on the gauge. Once you have reached desired inflation, remove the pump and quickly push down on the spring with your finger and turn a quarter turn until the spring pops up into the closed position. At this point, you can reattach the pump and top off the kayak. You don't really have to worry to much about over inflating the two main valves. It is kind of difficult to do. If you are worried about over inflating, your concerns should be more for the floor and then the smaller tubes.
The floor should be about 1 psi. You should be able to apply moderate pressure with your finger and still touch the bottom of the kayak. The smaller tubes only take a few pumps.
By the way, what model do you have. I can give you more specifics if I know what kayak you have.

Jeremy
8)

Posted: Thu Mar 20, 2008 11:24 pm
by KayakJack
Betty, try pushing the valve down and turning it counter clockwise or clockwise (whichever way to pop the spring, I forget) with your fingertip.

When it pops up, that is the Close/Inflate position. When it is depressed, it is the Open/Deflate position.


Good luck.

bettyv wrote:Thanks Jeremy....the problem is the spring does not pop back up thus I have to try manually and that's when I lose air. I'm using the hand pump with gauge which was sold accompanying the product. What am I missing here in the process? Thanks....

doesn't pop up

Posted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 12:09 am
by PJohanson
Betty, if your valve doesn't pop up the first time you try to inflate it, or pop in when you want to deflate it, don't despair. It took a couple of tries for my friend to figure it out for his boat, and even when he showed me it took a while for me to make my boat's valve work. Now it seems obvious.
If you bought it in a store, maybe the clerk or manager is familiar with the valve and will show you. The guys in my local stores are helpful.

Posted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 5:21 am
by bettyv
thanks for all the replies. I understand all this. My point is, the pressure when fully inflated is such that when I do use my finger to twist there often is the backup pressure resisting to immediately popping back up. That's when I have to re-pump. It seems my finger is dry and so slips on the plug. "I kinda wanna have some sticky glue on my finger to get traction!"

wishing for glue

Posted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 7:55 am
by PJohanson
Ah!
My finger slid, too. I'm small. I lick my fingertip and jam my fingernail into some of the grooves on the inner button. Gives me traction. Not good for my manicure, but as a guitar player I have short nails on my left hand that do the job.
Also helps if I'm wearing my gardening gloves with the rubber grip.
My husband is able to turn that inner button, no problem. Of course, he's used to using a screwdriver and said, "Righty tighty, lefty loosey."
Another friend has very big hands and can't work the valve at all. (He owns a thermoformed plastic Delta kayak.)

The inner button is supposed to be up when you're pumping air in. You can pull the pump hose off the valve and no air hisses out. The cap is just to keep you from bumping the button by accident while paddling.

Posted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 1:09 pm
by bettyv
Ah yes! The garden glove suggestion I think will do the trick! THANKS everyone (me being the newbie here)...I think that will do it for me with the inflation issues....I don't have to clutter cyberspace with anything else at the moment; will just get out and paddle!

or...

Posted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:10 pm
by KayakJack
Or buy a box of those thin latex gloves (same ones used in hospital, etc.). They're thin enough to get your fingers in the valve opening, disposable, and don't take up much space, etc.

bettyv wrote:Ah yes! The garden glove suggestion I think will do the trick! THANKS everyone (me being the newbie here)...I think that will do it for me with the inflation issues....I don't have to clutter cyberspace with anything else at the moment; will just get out and paddle!

Posted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:56 pm
by bettyv
Yes Jack...and I have dozens of those! Thanks for the reminder. And today I used a scrap of the no-slip rubberized shelving material I usually carry to untwist tight bottle caps!