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straitedge2 vs. Advanced Frame convertible

Posted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 1:09 am
by water, man
I'm interested in either of these boats for use in Hawaii. I need something that tracks well in current and wind, but is nimble enough for use in waves. I like the self-bailing feature of the straitedge2, but I like the fact that you can put the extra spine on the convertible to improve tracking. I wonder whether the convertible sinks much if water gets in it or whether it would be easy at all to empty it or bail it in rough water. Also, I'd probably use the convertible without the canopy, so basically as a sit-on-top, but I don't know whether it really would be easy to get in and out of the boat from the water. Any thoughts?

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2007 7:22 am
by gak
I have the Straitedge 2. I have used the Advanced Frame in the past.
The Straitedge 2 tracks ok, not as well as the advanced frame. I have not had two paddlers on the straitededge, mostly solo. It is not fast with one, would definitely move faster with two people propelling it. Stability of the Straitedge is amazing; no problems with waves from the side; you can read my review (with updates ) on paddling.net.
Max trip I have done is 7 miles around a harbor with no problems; paddling on your own you won't get there fast , but you will get there eventually. Unfortunately up here in the new england seaboard we don't have real surf to try it out in. Have been in winds of up to 15 knots without any real problems. I feel very, very safe in this kayak in rough/ choppy waves; it handles rough coastal water fine (I like to play where the waves are breaking over the submerged rocks....). The ride is wet, but relatively dry with the scupper holes closed. Rides fine with them open; haven't noticed any apprecable difference in performance with the scuppers open. Extremely stable (did I mention that already??...) entry and exit to and from the kayak is very easy; from dock, from beach, from sailboat, and easy to climb back in from deep water (side entry recommended). Place feet where the scupper holes are (I don't know what else to call them...) on EITHER SIDE of the inflatable floor and you can stand up on the thing; do NOT try standing directly on the inflatable floor or you may find yourself swimming with the fishes...
Hope this helps.

Posted: Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:51 am
by gak
the Advance frame I used was the single, not the convertable. When it starts filling with water handling becomes a problem. You don't care about filling with water with the selfbailing feature on the straitedge 2. However it definitely tracked better than the straitedge 2. They are both comfortable for long periods of time and both suitable for open coastal water. You will get there faster on the Advanced frame. Overall stability is excellent for both kayaks.

AF and water

Posted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 2:29 pm
by feldmarshal1
When I used my af expedition in the Navarre Bay the swells got to about 4 feet and I only had two waves in 6 hours of paddling that swept over the coaming, both from the right when i was in a pretty deep trough. All the water I took on board I got out with a sponge and towel and wouldn't have taken any if I had had on a spray skirt. but I will buy one of those kayak hand pumps for rougher days and more water just in case. Otherwise I never had any stability problems nor fear it in the future with my expedition or af 10.

Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 1:33 pm
by pastorsteve
You haven't updated to say whether you purchased one or not. My input for you is that even though the StraitEdge is self-bailing - that will only help you in fast water (river rapids). Just carry a bilge pump because with the open-top boats like the StraitEdge or PK-1 from Sevylor you will get water in the boat.

Self bailing becomes essentially holes in the bottom of your boat when paddling in flat water.