Search found 23 matches

by mtpaddler
Mon May 11, 2015 12:00 pm
Forum: Advanced Frame Convertible & Advanced Frame 2
Topic: Approximately how many pumps with the double action?
Replies: 4
Views: 5889

Number of pumps for a convertible

Double pump.
I start with 50 down strokes for each large chamber. Top off to adjust final pressure. Altitude - 6000 ft.
by mtpaddler
Thu Aug 02, 2012 9:53 am
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: ADVANCED ELEMENTS CUSTOMER SERVICE ROCKS!!
Replies: 1
Views: 4618

ADVANCED ELEMENTS CUSTOMER SERVICE ROCKS!!

Just wanted to relay a little story. We were fishing and decided to take a lunch break on shore. We stashed our convertible, removed the seats and took the paddles with us. While we were gone, several a**holes decided to take it out and play with it. When we got back the kayak was left on shore abou...
by mtpaddler
Thu Oct 13, 2011 6:27 pm
Forum: Advanced Frame Convertible & Advanced Frame 2
Topic: Which pump
Replies: 13
Views: 20845

2 PUMPS or not 2 PUMPS

Mario, I concur with sonar . I use my double action pump for pumping up my kayak initially and then use my foot pump to top it off should the pressure drop when I'm away on a jaunt. I keep it behind the back seat. A plus to two pumps is that two people can inflate the kayak and floor at the same tim...
by mtpaddler
Mon Aug 08, 2011 11:53 am
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: MONTANA SUMMER WEEKEND ADVENTURE
Replies: 2
Views: 5859

MONTANA SUMMER WEEKEND ADVENTURE

Reports were coming in that the walleye bite was on at Dailey Lake and with 2 art festivals and a parade going on in town this weekend it seemed like a great time to “get outta Dodgeâ€￾ so we loaded up the camper and inflatable kayak and headed for the lake.
Our two top choices for a campsite were taken and so we had to choose a site we had never camped in before. As it turned out, the position we had to park situated the camper dead into the wind (very stable), which howled at times. Very lucky on our part. People tent camping had to dismantled and re-erect their camps several times to keep the winds from destroying their tents. Thankfully the winds died down in the evenings but by 8:30 in the morning they were back to their 40 mph breezes.
We invited Dave and Shelley, friends of ours, up to camp with us and since they hadn’t shown up by 10:00 Saturday morning we decided to pump up the kayak and do some fishing. We had 4 walleye on the stringer by the time they showed up and then we had to stop fishing and go “visitâ€￾.
Dave and I headed out after lunch – I tried to convince him to use the worm rig but he had some new lures he wanted to try out so… I ended up adding walleye to the stringer – Dave – nothing. He was impressed at how stable the kayak was especially when the winds increased to the point where there were canoe capsizing waves and whitecaps. It got to the point that I felt it was safer to let Dave out on shore and paddle solo back to our beach site. Even in rough seas, I was able to clip the front seat into the solo position climb over the seat and continue on. I took on some water from splashes but never felt I was in any danger of flipping or swamping. If I had my spray skirt on I might have even toyed with the idea of playing around with the waves.
We had dinner and eventually around 9:00 pm the winds died down enough for us to have a fire. While Dave and I sipped on beers, Connie and Shelley ate s’mores and drank a bottle of wine. We went to bed and around 12:00 midnight, Connie & Shelley both heard a commotion that had both of them looking out the windows in separate locations in the camper. Dave & I slept through the whole thing. Apparently a Chevy suburban pulled up on the road alongside our camper, 6 or 7 kids all piled out with headlamps on and started running around on the road, around the suburban and the hillside with shovels and fishing poles. It was very strange behavior and when they finally drove off, Shelley and Connie were convinced that they were up to no good and had buried something in the middle of the night. After a breakfast of bacon, eggs and walleye fillets and the fact that Dave & I thought Shelley and Connie’s rantings were s’mores and wine induced hallucinations experienced on a mutual level, we decided to do some investigating. Although we searched a good portion of the crime scene we were unable to find any newly disturbed diggings so I decided to explore further up the hill toward some rock outcroppings and perhaps look for some snakes while I was at it. Imagine my surprise when I found a 4 ft western prairie rattler curled under a bush alongside a boulder. Maggie, our dog, and I run all over those hills when we’re camping without a thought as to the possibility of running into a rattler – that has since changed. While Dave & Connie kept an eye on the snake, I ran back down to get my 240cm kayak paddle. By the time I got back, Connie assured me that the snake was dead because it hadn’t moved when she tossed some rocks in its direction. However, when I slid my paddle under Mr. Snake, he was quite lively and crawled coiling closer to the rock. That is when we made the discovery that put all of the previous night’s episode into perfect clarity.
Heading back to town after a night of partying, the kids ran across the rattler crossing the road by our camper and decided to give chase. After cutting off the rattles with a precision shovel blow they lost track of the pissed-off injured snake and eventually gave up looking for him versus trying to find him in the dark. We couldn’t think of anything more dangerous to run across in a campground than an angry rattlesnake without any rattles and decided the best thing to do was to kill it. He now resides in our freezer in 4â€￾ pieces for when we get the gumption to cook him up; and we got a nice skin to boot.
It was comforting to discover our wives weren’t crazy after all. Dave & I decided to head out on the lake again since the wind wasn’t blowing strong enough to be a bother. I convinced him to try the worm set-up and by the time the wind forced us off the lake again, we had a nice stringer of 9 walleye. With a dozen walleye fillets and a snake in the refrigerator, we decided to call it quits and broke camp for the trip home. Another adventure in the bag.

Mr. Lucky
by mtpaddler
Thu Jun 02, 2011 9:44 am
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: MEMORABLE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND
Replies: 3
Views: 6354

As luck would have it, I had finally convinced Connie into letting me purchase a backbone for the convertible and this was the first trip I was able to use it. That purchase would have been nixed post transmission failure.

Mr. Lucky (oh yeah!)
by mtpaddler
Thu Jun 02, 2011 9:38 am
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: THE TALE OF OUR MOTHER'S DAY ADVENTURE
Replies: 2
Views: 5567

THE TALE OF OUR MOTHER'S DAY ADVENTURE

Maggie (the dog) & I left Thursday night so we could get our campsite early. We headed to Courts Sheriff campground on the shores of Canyon Ferry near Helena, Montana. It has paved campsites and since it's before the start of the general camping season, the sites are free. Consequently it tends to f...
by mtpaddler
Wed Jun 01, 2011 3:04 pm
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: MEMORABLE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND
Replies: 3
Views: 6354

MEMORABLE MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

It’s another Action-Packed Holiday camping trip...

The one thing I was wishing for Friday night as we headed south of Livingston, Montana toward Dailey Lake, was that the typhoon would hold off long enough for us to set up camp before it hit. The 8 mile gravel road in was in great shape – hard-packed mud. Usually it can be a rocky, dusty, rough drive in. The 40 mph winds and rain didn’t start until we had the camper parked but not quite leveled. It was so cute to see Connie walking backwards toward the truck to bring me my raincoat, the wind and rain whipping her frail little body. I steadied up the 5th wheel in full raingear and didn’t bother to unhook from the truck for added stability. Dinner for the evening was rib eye steaks and I was able to drag a picnic table over to the lee side of the camper and cook them on the grill in relatively calm conditions. The rain was blowing in a horizontal fashion over the roof so I stayed pretty dry (still in full raingear).
Saturday morning broke with a drizzle/rain and low cloud cover but that didn’t stop Connie from suiting up and drowning some worms for a few hours. The rain stopped around noon so we headed over to the pay kiosk to pay for our site (Friday night FREE!! Yeah!). After slipping the check in the slot, I started up the truck and… wasn’t able to get it in gear. Oooh, that’s not good. I turned it off, dropped it into 2nd and started it again. It lurched forward with the clutch in. That’s not good. We got back to camp and I did the “turn off engineâ€￾ thing again to back it into place and then crawled underneath to see if there was an adjustment that I could possibly make. It’s a sealed hydraulic system. Neat!
Nothing to do now but eat lunch and "GO FISHINâ€￾. After lunch, we got the kayak out and paddled around for an hour or two. Connie missed two good hits. Here’s a tip when using worm harnesses – make sure the end of the worm only extends from the last hook half an inch or so –any longer and the fish just pull off the end of the worm and swim away.
The evening was beautiful so we decided to have an early dinner before heading out for some night fishing. Our campsite was the last one on the south end of this little state managed area; we didn’t have any neighboring sites within two blocks of us and we were kind of surprised when a carload of boneheads drove past the 6 ft high 4 ft wide sign that said NO VEHICLE TRAVEL OFF ESTABLISHED ROADWAYS and parked on the little grass knoll overlooking the lake, 25 yards from our camper. Three guys with two big dogs piled out and proceeded to empty the trunk of wood construction scraps and haul it down to the lake shore. As a concerned citizen, I thought it would be in the best interest of the area to find out their intentions. The conversation went something like this: ME: “Hey guys, what’s ah.. going on?â€￾
BONEHEAD #1: “We’re campin’â€￾. ME: “Not here you’re not. What’s with all the wood?â€￾ BONEHEAD #2: “We’re gonna build a fire.â€￾
ME: “You’re only allowed to have fires in designated fire rings.â€￾ BONEHEAD # 3: “We’re gonna make one outta rocks.â€￾ I then proceeded to tell them they were in an area with designated camping sites and, a fee area, indicated by the huge-a** sign they had to pass on the way into the area and if they wanted to camp and have a fire they were going to have to move on down the road to the next available site. Failure to do so would result in the Fish, Wildlife & Parks officer, who’s traveled past this area three times today checking permits (a bold-faced lie), issuing a heavy fine, confiscating their equipment and impounding their car and dogs that were supposed to be leashed. They decided, with a combined IQ of 100, that perhaps it would be wise to move on and they packed up and did move down to an unoccupied campsite a fair distance from our camper. I returned to the camper to find Connie putting the .38 back in the closet.
After dinner, we returned to the lake and fished until 11:00 pm because the fishing was sooo darn good. We pulled to shore with one 9â€￾ perch and one 12â€￾ walleye that was mostly head and tail. After filleting Connie’s catch, no simple feat, we headed to bed joyful in the knowledge that we had enough fillets for 4 Ritz crackers.
Sunday we woke to 40 mph winds, pouring rain and the snow level dropping to within 500 ft of our elevation. It snowed a foot in Yellowstone Park that day, only a few miles south of our location. We spent the day inside with the heater running, playing games, reading and napping. That evening we tried fishing again but even the fish were holed up at home, riding out the storm.
Monday I decided to try to keep a positive attitude all day because, today was the day we were going to try to get home in one piece.
The drizzling rain stopped about 10:00 and I was able to wrap up the soaked kayak and break camp in dry conditions – nice. The truck backed up to the 5th wheel with no problem and we got underway. I had the trip home divided into 4 sections with the attitude that if we made it to the next section everything would be OK. We made it down the dirt road to the county road slowly but with no problems. We made it to the main highway OK and we made it onto I-90 with no problems. In fact we made it all the way home and had the camper parked before the clutch problems showed up again. We got the truck into the garage Tuesday night and our mechanic called with the news this morning – we need a new clutch – cost - $1000.00
…and so another memorable holiday of camping is in the books.

(On a side note - our convertible kayak seems to be the one constant as far as reliability and stress relief that we can depend on on our little adventures and we never leave home without it. )

I am so looking forward to 4th of July!

Mr. Lucky
by mtpaddler
Fri May 13, 2011 8:51 am
Forum: Advanced Frame Convertible & Advanced Frame 2
Topic: What Fits Me Best?
Replies: 17
Views: 24152

Product Info

Here's the product information for the convertible kayak.

http://www.advancedelements.com/advance ... tible.html

...and here's the product information for the backbone.

http://www.advancedelements.com/backbone.html
by mtpaddler
Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:47 am
Forum: Gear for Sale/Wanted
Topic: Good Price on Hi-Back Kayak Seat
Replies: 5
Views: 11364

Good Price on Hi-Back Kayak Seat

Cheapest price I've seen on these hi-back seats. Very comfortable with three built-in rod holders. These (2) still fit in the kayak (convertible) storage bag.

http://www.altrec.com/skwoosh/custom-gel-fishing-seat

Skwoosh custom fishing seat

Limited to stock on hand.
by mtpaddler
Fri Sep 24, 2010 3:22 pm
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: LABOR DAY CAMPING TRIP WITH CONVERTIBLE
Replies: 3
Views: 7232

I don't belong to an on-line photo service and can't link any photos. Not sure any are worth looking at -- couldn't get into the creative mood.
by mtpaddler
Thu Sep 23, 2010 11:45 am
Forum: Stories & Blogs
Topic: LABOR DAY CAMPING TRIP WITH CONVERTIBLE
Replies: 3
Views: 7232

LABOR DAY CAMPING TRIP WITH CONVERTIBLE

I can’t really say that many of our previous Labor Day weekends have been memorable. I’m sure there was some camping and fishing involved and there are pictures of those past holidays buried in the archives but few will be etched in our minds like the Labor Day weekend of 2010.

It started out innocent enough; we got on the road just a little after 6:00 pm Friday night, a pretty early evening start for us, and had just reached a speed limit of 60 mph heading toward Ennis from Four Corners when the driver a little white truck decided to do a rolling stop and pulled out right in front of us. I slammed on the brakes but there was no way the freight train we presented was going to slow down enough to avoid a catastrophic impact so I whipped the rig into the oncoming double yellow line of traffic (luckily no one was coming in the opposite direction) and leaned on the horn as we flew past the oblivious driver. He must have thought we were giving him a friendly Montana salute because he returned a horn honk of his own. While not enough of a scare to warrant a stop to change our shorts, as you can imagine, it was the topic of conversation for a number of miles.

We were graced with a beautiful evening when we arrived at Beavercreek Campground above Quake Lake and the temperature was pleasant enough that we decided to have a campfire and burgers outside so while I tended to getting things ready Connie leashed up Maggie and went for a walk to stretch their legs after the drive. It probably wasn’t 15 minutes before I heard Connie screaming hysterically out of breathe as she came running back down the road that Maggie had been hurt. I’m thinking twisted leg and held the door of the camper open while she rushed her inside. Maggie was covered in blood. A campsite at the top of the hill had half a dozen dogs running loose and a Malamute had run up and grabbed her, whipping her back and forth like a rag doll. Connie was able to force the dog’s jaws open by grabbing a hold of the bottom jaw and bending the nose back and Maggie took off running as soon as she hit the ground. Connie finally caught up with her several campsites down, snatched her up and ran back to camp, quite a feat considering Connie isn’t a jogger.

Looking Maggie over trying to discover the depths of her wounds, we found two good puncture wounds and a hole in her skin about the size of a nickel; she was definitely going to need stitches. One of her eyes was hemorrhaging too. About this time the owners of the dog showed up, profusely sorry and volunteered to drive us and Maggie to the nearest vet. We headed toward West Yellowstone and cell service. We finally got several bars after topping the dam at Hebgen. West Yellowstone we learned, doesn’t have a vet so we whipped a u-ey toward Ennis and got a hold of the vet there. He informed us that we were about an hour out and he would meet us at the hospital at 10:15. His time estimate was right on the money. As it turned out, the vet clinic was run by a husband/wife team and as you can well imagine, they had varying opinions as to the correct measures to take. The wife thought that they should administer antibiotics and some pain relief, shave the injured areas for an assessment and staple up the hole in Maggie’s side. The husband was leaning more to getting Maggie to throw up her dinner, putting her under and then hitting her with antibiotics and stitching her up. He didn’t have good results with staples but the wife’s record was much better. We went with the wife. It took them about ½ hour to take care of her and when she came out she looked a lot better, just not quite as spunky as usual. They gave us some antibiotics, some pain pills, some antiseptic spray and instructions on caring for Maggie. They gave the bill of $250.00 to the dog owners. On the way back to camp, they remarked how they couldn’t understand how their mild-manner dog could do such a thing. He only kills gophers, cats, rabbits and birds he catches but never dogs. I guess no dog has been unlucky enough to wander into their yard. Even after all this, the campground host still got complaints from various campers that these people’s dogs were running loose. We never ventured toward that end of the campground again.

After a fitful night of sleep for Connie – she kept reliving the attack in her mind, we finally tried to settle down Saturday morning and do a little fishing from the kayak. We had several nice rainbows on the stringer when I hooked into one of those insane “I wanna liveâ€￾ trout we’ve come love and fear when you fish Quake. After a fairly lengthy battle with several nice line peeling runs, Connie was finally able to net the big, healthy, let’s say 18â€￾er. The next set of events takes less time than you just spent reading this line. Upon netting the trout Connie discovered the handle to her reel was tangled in the webbing. While she was contemplating that issue, the netted fish decided to do a 180 flip in the net. We were fishing the old wedding ring worm harness and the ill-timed (or was it planned?) flip imbedded the upper hook squarely in Connie’s thumb while the trailing hook was still firmly imbedded in the mouth of “I wanna liveâ€￾. With Connie screaming and the fish still flopping, I decided against finesse, firmly grabbed the hook and ripped it out of Connie’s thumb. At the same time, the fish gave one final flip out of the net, popped off the hook, bounced off the side of the kayak and landed in the water on the opposite side of that from which it was netted. We paddled away from several mystified observers and are seriously contemplating bringing along a small bat.

Sunday morning broke calm and sunny. We ate a quick breakfast of oatmeal and peaches and decided to forego the usual morning coffee thereby avoiding numerous shore-side bathroom breaks. We fished until around 11:30 when the wind started to pick up and headed for shore. Others who were familiar with just how quickly events can turn also headed for terra firma but there were a few who decided to continue fishing just a little longer and were eventually overcome by strong wind and waves and battled to get to the safety of solid land. They would be in for a 4 hour wait until the winds died down enough for a tough row or paddle the mile and a half back to the boat launch. Around 4:00 with the winds settling and Connie and the dog napping, I thought it might be a good time for me to do a little solo kayak trip up to the Madison River inlet. Climbing into the kayak, I noticed the clouds to the west had a weird gold hue to them and thought, “Maybe its sunlight filtering through the bottom of the clouds and it’ll turn into a beautiful eveningâ€￾. By the time I reached the east end of Quake the wind had started to pick up – and then it started to rain. I wasn’t worried because I had on my raincoat and hat and my legs were covered so everything was good. The force of the wind continued to increase making headway extremely difficult. Not to worry – I was heading with the direction of the river current. I noticed my hands started getting cold and looked up to discover I was in the middle of a blizzard of grapple snow pellets. By the time I got back to my landing area, everything in the kayak was covered with a layer snow and soaked with rain. I was so exhausted by my paddling ordeal that I didn’t realize that my legs had fallen asleep and when I went to step onto shore they collapsed under me and I stumbled backwards into the lake, filling my boots with water. I stashed the kayak where it wouldn’t blow away and battled my way through chest-high willows to the trail back up to the camper. I was soaked from the waist down but the uphill climb back to camp kept me warm. Connie was happy to see my paddle flashing through the trees as I walked up the trail. Just a few minutes earlier the view to the lake had been obscured by flying snow. She had to lower the awning over the front door of the camper to keep it from collapsing under the weight of the rain-soaked snow. As is often the case with extreme weather, by the time I had changed my clothes and warmed up, the sun came out revealing beautiful snow-capped peaks. I had to go out and took several pictures of our first snow. Gotta love Mother Nature. Red beans and rice with Louisiana hotlinks made for the perfect “warm ya upâ€￾ dinner. I could have used some Scotch.

The storm passed in the night but left behind a nice breeze. The morning paddle back to the boat launch was pleasant but a bit of a workout. I did manage to hook and land a nice brown but by the time I had him on the stringer I’d lost 75 yards of forward progress. I didn’t remove my rod from the water, but for the rest of the trip I silently hoped I wouldn’t catch another fish. I didn’t. After lunch we decided to drown some worms and settled in at Connie’s “spotâ€￾. She found this “spotâ€￾ earlier in the summer and for reasons we’ve yet to discover if you put a worm in the “spotâ€￾, you catch huge trout. The “spotâ€￾ is only an area about 15 ft x 15 ft. Any distance, however small, to the side or front or back, and you could be sitting there all day – while hitting the mark can have you limited out in two hours – and the fish are huge. What distinguishes the “spotâ€￾ from other parts of the featureless lake surface is a stump barely visible under the water’s surface. People generally avoid obstacles like that when they notice them. We caught 6 fish that afternoon (5 : 1 only because Connie let me toss my rig in the “spotâ€￾ while I cleaned the rest of the fish). We watched a belly-boater launch his craft while his wife watched; he promptly caught a fish, showed the wife and then threw it back. His plan, we learned later, was to catch fish for dinner. That was the last fish he caught; he was forced to watch Connie haul in pigs (just like me).

And so our Labor Day weekend ended. On a side note – Maggie got her staples removed September 21, and is doing fine. She’s lost her curiosity of big dogs and sees them as a threat. We’ll have to see how that works out.
by mtpaddler
Thu Jun 17, 2010 2:40 pm
Forum: Advanced Frame Convertible & Advanced Frame 2
Topic: What Fits Me Best?
Replies: 17
Views: 24152

I'm not 250 lbs but I haven't experienced any bending in the middle of the convertible. There's always the backbone option if, after you buy your boat you need a way to stiffen it.
by mtpaddler
Mon May 24, 2010 3:27 pm
Forum: Advanced Frame Convertible & Advanced Frame 2
Topic: AFC2 in whitewater
Replies: 7
Views: 10278

I've rafted and kayaked the Arkansas many times between Buena Vista and Canon City. That is the most popular stretch for rafting and can be very dangerous. If it was my first trip I'd book with professionals. I own a convertible and a duckie. The 'vert is great up to class 2 but the duckie can handl...
by mtpaddler
Wed Mar 04, 2009 10:22 am
Forum: Gear for Sale/Wanted
Topic: Great Deal on Marine Medical KIt
Replies: 0
Views: 6210

Great Deal on Marine Medical KIt

Adventure Medical Kits Marine 200 Kit - Waterproof
http://www.sierratradingpost.com/Produc ... =TopSeller