Chamber 1

AE1002(2002-2005), AE1012(2006-Present), AE1017-O(2009-Present)

Moderator: JCOOLEY

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koolz
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:21 pm

Chamber 1

Post by koolz » Mon Sep 24, 2012 8:36 am

Hi guys...

I have been a silent reader in this forum, and 3 days ago I just got my new AF 10.5. I have yet to inflate. 2 questions that I am not sure of is :

1. For chamber 1. How much air do I need to pump in ? A ballpark figure would be helpful eg 1 PSI or 1.5 PSI before I proceed to the chamber 2.

2. I saw scratch about 3mm which expose darker grey/black material at front hull side. Not sure how does it appear. Should I apply patch or glue over it ? Any possibility that it would leak water into the kayak...? :roll:


Opinions is much appreciated...
Cheers from a newbie... :D

NaturalPath
Posts: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:39 am

Post by NaturalPath » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:07 am

Hey Koolz, the inflation instructions don't exactly give a particular pressure for the partial inflation of the first chamber. It just says to pump until the kayak starts to take shape. This is pretty vague, but I don't really think that it's all that important to worry how much air you put in each main chamber. What I do is, put half the amount of air in each chamber, and I do this by counting the strokes while pumping. With the double action pump that I have, I use 40 strokes, counted on the down-stroke, and then about 38 into the second main chamber, depending on temperature and other such things. Of course, this will vary, depending on which type pump you are using, but I'm just giving you an example that might help you.

There is a very flexible partition between the two chambers and it will adjust any difference in pressures, should you put a little more in either chamber.

As far as the damage to your hull goes, I'm not quite sure I understand the type of damage you are describing but, it doesn't sound like you need a patch on there. I would tend to use some Aquaseal on the scratch, to fill it in, and then let it dry for about 24 hours before use. Do not put too much on, it tends to flow a bit after it is applied, just enough to fill in the scratch. Keep the surface of the repaired area horizontal and level, so that the Aquaseal does not run out of the scratched area.

You mentioned that you just received this kayak new, so it should not have any damage on it. Before you try to repair it yourself, I would contact either AE or the seller to find out if warranty coverage is applicable here.

JimD
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 6:05 am
Location: UK

Post by JimD » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:46 am

I do more or less the same. The first time I inflated, I counted pump strokes in chamber one, until it started to take shape as described. Then I transferred to the second chamber, and continued counting until I reached full pressure.

I divided the total number of strokes by two, and from then on, I put that number of strokes in chamber one, and watch my pressure as I reach that number again in chamber two. It seems to work for me, and I know that the two chambers contain about the same amount of air.

JCOOLEY
Site Admin
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Location: Benicia, CA

Post by JCOOLEY » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:52 am

When inflating chamber 1, you will inflate until the kayak rises off of the ground and has some shape. This is Approx. 1 psi. You may get a reading on the gauge if you have one but usually not. Move to chamber 2 and inflate until 2 psi. You should, at this point, have fairly equal amounts of air in each chamber.

koolz
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:21 pm

Post by koolz » Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:03 pm

Guys...

Thank you soo much for the helpful advices. I will be trying to inflate the kayak later.

May I know what is the material for the exterior grey outer cover, is it hypalon ?

When air chambers are leaking, we can test by air bubbles escaping with soap solution. But how do we detect and test puncture and leaks from the outer cover ?

Would it be advisable to install keel guard ?



Cheers... :D

NaturalPath
Posts: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:39 am

Post by NaturalPath » Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:15 pm

Koolz, I believe the hull of the kayak is made from a heavy duty PVC coated fabric.

One method you could use to check for leaks in the hull itself would be to remove all the inside parts from the hull, place it on some dry newspapers and put some water inside the hull. If there is any water getting outside the hull, you will be able to detect it from wet spots on the newspaper.

I'm not sure what you mean by "keel" but if you are referring to the skeg, which sticks down from the bottom of the rear of the kayak, then I don't believe it needs a guard of any kind. I hit stuff with my skeg all the time and it hasn't suffered any damage.

koolz
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:21 pm

Post by koolz » Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:37 pm

Thanks NP for the good newspaper tip... :D

As for the keel, what I am thinking is additional protection for the hull or anything that would prevent scraping the bottom part.. :roll:

NaturalPath
Posts: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:39 am

Post by NaturalPath » Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:49 pm

Hey Koolz, First of all, you have to remember that the kayak was designed to fold up into the duffel bag, so any modifications that you make must allow for this. I did make a modification to my kayak that somewhat protects the bottom of the kayak, but I did not put anything in areas where the kayak material must bend in order to fold properly.

Also, if you did make any modifications to your kayak, you may affect the warranty, so be aware of that.

I'm not sure that this is something that the moderators of this AE forum would want posted, so if you would like further info on what I did with my kayak, I could provide more details with pictures privately. You can contact me at NaturalPath@live.ca

koolz
Posts: 16
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:21 pm

Post by koolz » Mon Sep 24, 2012 8:03 pm

Hi NP...

That's great !! I have just emailed to you... :D :D

joshcl
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Jun 19, 2011 2:40 pm

Post by joshcl » Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:19 pm

JCOOLEY wrote:When inflating chamber 1, you will inflate until the kayak rises off of the ground and has some shape. This is Approx. 1 psi. You may get a reading on the gauge if you have one but usually not. Move to chamber 2 and inflate until 2 psi. You should, at this point, have fairly equal amounts of air in each chamber.
I know this topic is a little old but kind of wanted to bring this up again as I've been doing it wrong. I've been pumping like 20-25 times on the first chamber and then moving to the second chamber until 2 psi. Then I'd go back to the first and make it 2 psi.

So I should only be pumping up the first chamber until it is beginning to inflate and then the second chamber should be 2 psi it looks like. Since at first you don't get a psi reading on chamber 1 is it safe to use the 1 psi reading when you go back and check it after?

Timbo
Posts: 90
Joined: Tue Jul 12, 2011 4:21 pm
Location: The Netherlands , Europe

Post by Timbo » Tue Apr 16, 2013 2:59 am

I would like to put something straight about the tubes.
It is actually one large tube vertically separated by an inner flat PVC membrane so that you have an outer and an inner ring , so as you can imagine overinflating from just one valve is not a good idea as this would cause this to stretch unnecessarily
On advice from a very reliable source , i inflate my Convertible in the following way.
Valve 2 and then 1.
So the one on the inside grey tube first ,then the valve on top of the rear deck.
This has the effect of immediately pushing some outwards shape into the craft because the inner ring is inflated slightly first and also holds the floor and Backbone in place and keeps it all straight , not too hard though , a lot less than 1 psi (i use a Coleman Quickpump mentioned in this thread ) http://www.advancedelements.com/phpBB2/ ... php?t=1296, (amazingly fast and effortless), then go to the rear deck (outer ring) valve and complete the inflation process with a handpump to 2 to 2.3PSI. check both chambers afterwards for equal pressure , although the slightly flexible inner membrane should do this.
TIP: I asually put a very small amount of air in valve 2 just before installing the Backbone and floor ,it seems to make it all easier to work with.
I have also marked with permanent marker for the position , just a dot on
each side of the BB on both ends (skidplate and fin) when this is in the correct position.

NaturalPath
Posts: 152
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:39 am

Post by NaturalPath » Tue Apr 16, 2013 6:53 am

To be honest, I'm kinda glad I got the pump with no gauge on it. It forces me to pay more attention to the inflation process and how the tubes feel when inflated properly. The pressure inside the tubes can, and will, change according to temperature. That's not usually a problem when the kayak is in the water, but if you take it out and leave it in the sun, it doesn't take long for the pressure to rise.
When you're out kayaking and enjoying the surroundings, it's easy to forget about this but I've gotten into the habit of always feeling the tubes to get a sense of how the pressure is.
I have always started inflation on the number one chamber, or the valve on the outside of the kayak and have had no problems doing so. With the pump I have, which is the large yellow double action pump, I put 40 pumps, counted on the downstroke, into the first chamber, at which point the kayak starts to take a bit of shape, then I move to the second chamber and put 'up to' 40 pumps in it. I feel the tube as I get to 35 pumps, and add more as required.
This process has worked great for me, and there's never any guessing. On the floor tube, I always put in 20 pumps, counted on the downstroke, and I've written that number on the floor tube with black marker, so that I don't forget.

I suppose everyone has their own way of inflating these kayaks. Whatever they feel most comfortable with. It's always good to keep the manufacturers specs in mind too, although I've never been all that good at doing what I'm told :P

JCOOLEY
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 2:46 pm
Location: Benicia, CA

Post by JCOOLEY » Tue Apr 16, 2013 9:04 am

Chamber 1 - inflate until the kayak rises off of the ground and takes shape. It should still appear saggy and wrinkled but should begin to resemble a kayak.
Chamber 2 - Inflate until kayak is rigid. (without Backbone installed) you should be able to pick the kayak up from either end and there should be no bending of folding in the middle. If there is, you can add more air to either chamber. When you are done inflating Chamber 2, there is no need to go back to Chamber one unless you have put the kayak in the cold water and lost a slight amount of pressure. You can go back to Chamber 1 and top it off.
When the kayak is completely inflated, you should have a PSI reading of 2.5 at the most for the main tube and 1 PSI for the floor and smaller tubes.
Of course I have done this for many years so I do not require a gauge because I know where the kayak should be at. It is difficult to over inflate the main tube. After leaving it in the sun for most of the day, alot of times it can get close to 4 PSI. Always let some air out if leaving it out. The floor is where you need to be the most cautious. If left out or pumped until rigid, you risk seperating the I-Beams the run the length of the floor. This will cause a large bubble and is uncomfortable to sit on. The floor still functions but looks odd and is difficult to sit on.

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