Going solo with our AEC

AE1007-R(2005-Present), AE1004-R(2002-2004)

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FrankP
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Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:44 am
Location: Wisconsin

Going solo with our AEC

Post by FrankP » Tue Oct 02, 2012 8:50 pm

Today I paddled our AE Convertible solo using the BB and the DS floor and the solo deck. While paddling the lake I found that the bow waggled with each stroke and I was having more difficulty tracking. I noticed 1 hr 40 min later when I took out at the dock the BB was slightly off center in the stern by 1 inch. I also found that the tie down my wife uses to keep our WindPaddle sail down was dragging over the side of the bow and that was connected to a paddle cord.

I adjusted my body and it was still a problem. With my wife in the kayak we see very little if any waggle and I have far less trouble with steering to the right if t all.

I would like to paddle solo at times but it seemed less fun because of the steering to the right and the waggle. What is wrong here? Is the waggle normal going solo?

cfal
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Location: Long Island, NY

Post by cfal » Wed Oct 03, 2012 3:15 am

I don't own one but I have read not to use the DS floor and backbone together.

Timbo
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Location: The Netherlands , Europe

Post by Timbo » Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:19 am

By using DS and BB yu have created a flat bottomed hull with a keel.
The BB and standard floor combo forms a deep concaved v-hull which is more directionally stable.
Btw how much pressure do you have in the main tubes?
Its actually possible to adjust the BB position a small amount whilst inflated .
That stray tie down may have caused enough drag to affect things.

FrankP
Posts: 68
Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:44 am
Location: Wisconsin

Post by FrankP » Wed Oct 03, 2012 5:46 am

Actually the DS?BB combo does not make a concave V hull. There is a definite V hull, however, there is more of a flat bottom because of the DS floor.

Any other thoughts as to the single vs double rider that causes the bow to move side to side more with each stroke?

I didn't notice dragging the strap and paddle stay until after getting out so you may be right. I will give it another try and see if getting the BB centered perfectly and get rid of the strap issue.

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PJohanson
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Post by PJohanson » Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:16 am

Waggling is more common when the paddler is taking long strokes. As your name is Frank, I'm guessing that you're a man, probably taller than me and with longer arms than mine.
Relax, take shorter strokes, and the boat will waggle less. To go faster, increase your cadence but not the length of your strokes.

When you're in a long hardshell sea kayak, you can reach as far forward as you can reach easily, and use the paddle for long strokes, nearly parallel to the gunwhales.
When you're in a Convertible, the boat is wider for its length than many hardshells of the same length. You can try adjusting your stroke a little to reduce waggle.

How I learned to adjust my stroke is this:
-don't reach as far forward with the paddle. The stroke will be shorter. The blade is in the water from just past my knees to my hips, not from my ankles to my hips. The blade should come out of the water at your hips anyway, no matter what kayak you're paddling.
-the path of the blade through the water is a little more angled. Instead of perfectly parallel to the gunwhales, the path is closer to my knee and farther from my hip.
Hope this description helps.

FrankP
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Location: Wisconsin

Post by FrankP » Fri Oct 05, 2012 7:18 pm

Thanks PJohanson
I will try that possibly tomorow afternoon, however the temperture will max out at 50. I don't seem to notice the waggle at all with my wife in the front. what accounts for that?
Frank

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PJohanson
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Post by PJohanson » Sat Oct 06, 2012 6:38 pm

Frank, when you've got two paddlers in a kayak, you're usually paddling on opposite sides at the same time. The sideways part of the push in your stroke is matched by the sideways part of the push in the other paddler's stroke.
I have noted less waggle when my bow paddler is just riding as a passenger, and in that case the weight of a passenger might be slowing the movement of the bow from side to side. As well, the stern paddler is not sitting in the middle of the kayak where the bow and stern can pivot around the paddle. The kayak will still be pivoting a little with each stroke, but it takes more sideways push during your forward stroke to make the boat waggle. Stern paddlers who want to steer the bow in one direction or the other efficiently will use the paddle as a rudder instead: a brief draw or pry stroke, or just holding the blade in the water at an angle for a few seconds while the boat glides on.

FrankP
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Joined: Mon May 28, 2012 10:44 am
Location: Wisconsin

Post by FrankP » Sat Oct 06, 2012 7:18 pm

I think you are right about the bow paddler weight. When we paddle we are synchronized and both paddle on the same side with each stroke. Otherwise it's a war of paddles hitting each other. As far as I know this is the correct method for two to paddle.

When you are solo does the bow move side to side in any kind of kayak?

JimD
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Post by JimD » Sun Oct 07, 2012 11:31 am

FrankP wrote: ... When we paddle we are synchronized and both paddle on the same side with each stroke. Otherwise it's a war of paddles hitting each other. As far as I know this is the correct method for two to paddle...
I've got to agree. And the competitors in the recent olympics do too...

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