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kayak bending

Posted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:17 am
by srich
Hi...I have a 3 week old AF convertible. Have used it 5-6 times, and I am very happy with it. After inflating, it is rigid and can be picked up without bending. After completing a 60-90 minute trip, it bends when we carry it back to the car (even though there are no puddles in it). Is this normal? Perhaps a result of the fabric being wet. I am concerned that maybe it is leaking air -- even though I don't see or hear a leak. Thanks for any insights.

Posted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 4:11 am
by sedimentary
Ironic-- this exact thing happened to us last friday when we had to do a 600 foot carry back to the lot. We were on a 3 hour trek before this happened. Curious to see the answers also.

Posted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 8:32 am
by JCOOLEY
When you place inflatables in the water, they will automatically lose some air due to the temperature change from the water. Water is always colder than the air outside. This is common in all inflatables, whether kayaks, towables or pool toys. A good suggestion is once you have inflated the kayak, place it in the water for 5-10 minutes so that it can change pressure. Once it has lost some pressure, you can now top it off with your pump. If you do not want to wait for the kayak to pressurize, bring your pump along with you so that after paddling awhile you can top the kayak off. You can do this by either paddling to shore or you can even do it while on the water. Depending on what pump you have depends on how easy it will be to top it off on the water. One other thing, make sure that you do have the caps screwed on the valves. If you do not, it may lose a little air.

Jeremy
8)

kayak bending

Posted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 5:48 pm
by srich
Thanks for the tips...will try this.

Posted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:03 pm
by poiuyebay
JCOOLEY wrote:When you place inflatables in the water, they will automatically lose some air due to the temperature change from the water. Water is always colder than the air outside. This is common in all inflatables, whether kayaks, towables or pool toys. A good suggestion is once you have inflated the kayak, place it in the water for 5-10 minutes so that it can change pressure. Once it has lost some pressure, you can now top it off with your pump. If you do not want to wait for the kayak to pressurize, bring your pump along with you so that after paddling awhile you can top the kayak off. You can do this by either paddling to shore or you can even do it while on the water. Depending on what pump you have depends on how easy it will be to top it off on the water. One other thing, make sure that you do have the caps screwed on the valves. If you do not, it may lose a little air.

Jeremy
8)
What about the risk of overinflation? I usually start paddling in the late morning (~80 F) and return in the afternoon (~110 F). Will overinflation be an issue if I pump more cold air in the morning?

Hope it worked out allright for you, srich.

Posted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 9:07 am
by JCOOLEY
poiuyebay wrote:
JCOOLEY wrote:When you place inflatables in the water, they will automatically lose some air due to the temperature change from the water. Water is always colder than the air outside. This is common in all inflatables, whether kayaks, towables or pool toys. A good suggestion is once you have inflated the kayak, place it in the water for 5-10 minutes so that it can change pressure. Once it has lost some pressure, you can now top it off with your pump. If you do not want to wait for the kayak to pressurize, bring your pump along with you so that after paddling awhile you can top the kayak off. You can do this by either paddling to shore or you can even do it while on the water. Depending on what pump you have depends on how easy it will be to top it off on the water. One other thing, make sure that you do have the caps screwed on the valves. If you do not, it may lose a little air.

Jeremy
8)
What about the risk of overinflation? I usually start paddling in the late morning (~80 F) and return in the afternoon (~110 F). Will overinflation be an issue if I pump more cold air in the morning?

Hope it worked out allright for you, srich.
If you are out on the water, it shouldn't be an issue. The only time it really is is if you take a break on a shore for a long period of time. A couple of hours or so. If the kayak is left out in the sun, the air insid ethe tubes is expanding. Overinflation happens more so in the floor than the main tubes. If leaving it out in the sun, just let a little air out of it. Make sure you have a pump with you though. When you go to get back on the water, you want to make sure that the kayak is pumped up all the way.

Jeremy
8)

Posted: Mon Aug 25, 2008 12:01 pm
by river_rat
I guess I've noticed this very slightly now that you've brought it up. I bought some bungies and rigged them on the back and always carry my foot pump with me. I've never had to re-inflate but then usually only go out for a couple of hours. Point being: carry the footpump on the rear.
Richard